geochemisrty

Geochemistry

Geochemistry is at the heart of many geoscience investigations, from hot, hard rocks of the earth's interior, to agricultural soils, to studies of surface and ground water. Geochemistry is a tool to answer fundamental questions about earth and environmental materials - What is this made of? How does this behave, both naturally and in interaction with humans? What can this tell us about the earth's history, and humanity's interactions with the environment? Geochemistry is crucial to addressing many of the most pressing questions facing humanity, such as air, water, and soil quality, energy resources, and environmental health.

The Department of Geosciences has facilities to support the geochemical investigations of faculty and students, including:

• Ion Chromatograph

• Atomic Absorption

• Wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer

• Field-portable energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer

• X-ray diffraction

• K-Ar mass spectrometer

• Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer

• Atmospheric CO2 monitor and weather station

Ph.D. student Jill Ghelerter filters a water sample at an oil-contaminated site in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, as part of Dr. Deocampo's project funded by the National Science Foundation studying biodegradation of BP/Deepwater Horizon petroleum in marshes.

Ph.D. student Jill Ghelerter filters a water sample at an oil-contaminated site in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, as part of Dr. Deocampo's project funded by the National Science Foundation studying biodegradation of BP/Deepwater Horizon petroleum in marshes.

Dr. Deocampo's team lands on a Typha marsh in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, in December, 2010, with much of the vegetation still dead as a result of oil contamination from the BP/Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Dr. Deocampo's team lands on a Typha marsh in
Barataria Bay, Louisiana, in December, 2010, with
much of the vegetation still dead as a result of oil
contamination from the BP/Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Some recent published geochemical investigations include:

Deocampo, D.M., Cuadros, J., Wing-Dudek, T., Olives, J., and Amouric, M., 2009. Saline lake diagenesis as revealed by coupled mineralogy and geochemistry of multiple ultrafine clay phases: Pliocene Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania. American Journal of Science, vol. 309, p. 834-868.

Deocampo, D.M., and Tactikos, J.C., 2010. Geochemical gradients and artifact mass densities on the lowermost Bed Ii eastern lake margin (~1.8 Ma), Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania. Quaternary Research, 74:411-423.

Deocampo, D.M., Behrensmeyer, A.K., and Potts, R., 2010. Ultrafine clay minerals of the Pleistocene Olorgesailie Formation, Southern Kenya Rift: Diagenesis and Paleoenvironments of Early Hominins. Clays and Clay Minerals, 58:293-309.

Deocampo, D.M., 2010. The Geochemistry of Continental Carbonates. In: Alonso- Zarza, A.M. and Tanner, L.H., Eds., Carbonates in Continental Settings, Geochemistry, Diagenesis, and Applications. Developments in Sedimentology, Elsevier, vol. 62, p. 1-59.

Diem, J.E., 2009. Atmospheric characteristics conducive to high-ozone days in the Atlanta metropolitan area. Atmospheric Environment, 43: 3902-3909.

Diem, J.E., and Styers, D.M., 2008. Ozone exposure and potential for vegetation injury within Atlanta, Georgia metropolitan area. Southeastern Geography, 48: 172-182.

Diem, J.E., Ricketts, C.R., and Dean, J.R., 2006. Impacts of urbanization on land-atmosphere carbon exchange within a metropolitan area in the USA. Climate Research, 30:201-213.

Elliott, W.C., Basu, A., Wampler, J.M., Elmore, R.D., 2006. A comparison of K-Ar ages of diagenetic illite to the age of chemical remnant magnetization, An Example from the Isle of Skye, Scotland. Clays and Clay Minerals, 54:314-323.

Elliott, W.C., Osborn, S., Elmore, R.D., O'Brien, V., Engle, M.H., Wampler, J.W., 2006. On the timing and causes of illite formation and remagnetization in the Cretaceous Marias River Shale, Disturbed Belt, Montana. Journal of Geochemical Exploration, 89:92-95.

Goto, M., Rosson, R., Wampler, J.M., Elliott, W.C., Serkiz, S., and Kahn, B., 2008. Freundlich and Dual Langmuir Isotherm models for predicting 137-Cs Binding on Savannah River Site Soils. Health Physics Journal, 94:18-32.

Kashefi, K., Shelobolina, E., Elliott, W.C., Lovely, D.R., 2008. Growth of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic microorganisms on Fe(III) minerals: Applied Environmental Microbiology, 94:251-258.

Jackson, M., Deocampo, D., Marra, F., and Scheetz, B. Mid-Pleistocene Pozzolanic Volcanic Ash in Ancient Roman Concretes. Geoarchaeology, vol. 25, p. 36-74.

Pollack, G.D. *, Krogstad, E.J., and Bekker, A., 2009, U-Th-Pb-REE systematics of organic-rich shales from the ca. 2.15 Ga Sengoma Argillite Formation, Botswana: evidence for oxidative continental weathering during the Great Oxidation Event. Chemical Geology, 260:172-185.

Rose, S., 2007. Utilization of decadal scale tritium variation for assessing the residence time of base flow. Ground Water, 45:309-317.

Rose, S., 2007. The effect of urbanization upon the hydrochemistry of base flow within the Chattahoochee River Basin (Georgia, U.S.A.). Journal of Hydrology, 341:42-54.

Rose, S., 2009. Rainfall-runoff trends in the southeastern United States: 1938-2005. Hydrological Processes, 23:1105-1118.

Rose, S., 2010 (in press). A statistical methodology for assessing the long-termed effects of antecedent rainfall upon stream runoff: applications to the Piedmont Province, southeastern U.S.A". Hydrological Processes.

Waight, T.E., Wiebe, R.A., Krogstad, E.J., 2007. Isotopic evidence for multiple contributions to felsic magma chambers: Gouldsboro Granite, Coastal Maine. Lithos, 93:234-247.

Yang JJ, Yang J, Wei L, Zurkiya O, Yang W, Li S, Zou J, Zhou Y, Mannicia A, Mao H, Zhao F, Malchow R, Zhao S, Johnson J, Hu X, Krogstad E, and Li Z, 2008. Rational Design of Protein-based MRI Contrast Agents. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 130:9260-9267.